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Charts-Graphs

by Carlos Batara

IMMIGRATION CHARTS AND GRAPHS

Demystifying Immigration Law

Understanding immigration rules can be difficult.

We’d like to help you out. 

But we also know lawyer explanations often makes things more confusing. 

It’s lawyer talk.  It’s part of our training.

So we decided to take a different approach. We decided to design charts and graphs that explain immigration rules, regulations, and concepts in a simplified way.

IMMIGRATION PETITIONS FOR FAMILY MEMBERS

immigration-family-petitions-chart

This chart shows which family relatives you can immigrate to the United States.

There are two columns. They reflect how immigration law divides sponsoring family members into two categories.

The left column is for U.S. citizens.  The right column is for lawful permanent residents.

For more information on immigration family petitions, click here: Immigration Family Petitions And Visas .

DEPORTATION DEFENSE: THE HARDSHIP SPECTRUM

deportation-hardship-graph

Hardship is often the most important requirement for victory in cancellation of removal cases and deportation defense trials.

These graphs illustrate how immigration courts assess hardship.

Click here for a complete set of graphs, including the current version of hardship used by immigration courts: Immigration Hardship Spectrum.

THE LEGACY OF IIRAIRA

riverside-deportation-defense-lawyer-post-iiraira-eligibility-graph

For nearly two decades, immigration rules have been increasingly tightened. Avenues for legalization have been restricted or eliminated, especially for immigrants who face the risk of deportation at immigration court.

This set of graphs provide a summary of immigration history and show the role Congress has played in narrowing the opportunities for immigrants to earn permanent residency.

To view the complete set of these graphs, click here: Immigration History: IIRAIRA.

THE PERMANENT RESIDENCE PROCESS

permanent-residence-green-card-process
The green card process is puzzling to many immigrants.

Their dreams of legalizing their status through a family relative seems far-fetched, as the road to becoming a permanent resident looks too difficult to surmount.

Who can sponsor who? How long will it take? Where will the interview be held?

As this chart demonstrates, the road to permanent residency, when broken into its main pieces, does not seem hard to understand.

Of course, the requirements can still cause a lot of headaches for green card seekers, even when they understand how the process works.

For more information, click here: The Family-Based Permanent Resident Process.

FAMILY UNITY WAIVERS: I-601 HARDSHIP FACTORS

i-601-extreme-hardship-factors-chartSome media outlets have called I-601 waivers the new family unity waivers.

These waivers, if granted by the government, overcome inadmissibility problems for undocumented immigrants seeking to win permanent residency status.

To win these cases, the hardship of U.S. citizen family members must be proven.

There are, at minimum, eight essential factors which can be used to demonstrate your family’s hardship.

For more information about hardship waivers, click here: I-601 Hardship Waivers.

IMMIGRATION DEFENSE TIMELINE

immigration-hardship-standards-history-chart-1900-2000Much of the news about immigration law focuses on issues of deportation.

For example, the proposed prosecutorial discretion measures for immigrant youth, even the I-601 waivers for immigrant spouses, are related to deportation defense.

To an extent, the history of immigration law is the history of deportation law.

As this chart shows, the rules for excusing immigrants who arrived without permission, overstayed their permission, or perhaps violated a condition of their residency have grown tighter over the years – at the same time as the country’s political policies towards immigrants have grown more restrictive.

For more information, click here: Immigration History: A Deportation Defense Timeline.

DEPORTATION DEFENSE: INA 212(c)

riverside-immigration-lawyer-illustrates-supreme-court-212(c)-substantive-analysis

Section 212(c) of the Immigration and Nationality Act was eliminated by Congress in the the mid-1990s. Since that time, there had been a major debate over which lawful permanent residents still qualify for defense against defense under this provision.

These charts illustrate both the older approach which had been used by immigration courts to decide 212(c) cases for several years and the newer approach outlined by the Supreme Court in December 2011.

For more information on this issue, click here: Immigration And Nationality Act Section 212(c).

DO YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS?

We plan to keep adding new charts and graphs to this section.

If there are any rules, regulations, concepts, or data, you would like us to explain, feel free to send your questions or ideas to info@bataraimmigrationlaw.com.

We’ll do our best to address your concerns, and to help you better understand the ins and outs of immigration law.

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