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Carlos Batara - Immigration Attorney

Honduras TPS And Nicaragua TPS: The End Or A New Beginning?

– Posted in: Temporary Protected Status

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Nearly 20 years old, Honduras TPS and Nicaragua TPS are two of the longest-standing TPS programs.

However, termination dates for both programs have been set.

Nicaragua Temporary Protected Status benefits were designated for closure earlier this year, on January 5, 2019.

Honduras Temporary Protected Status has been scheduled to end on January July 5, 2020.

Due to pending lawsuits, the issue when and if TPS benefits for both nations will terminate is unclear.

Haiti Temporary Protected Status Extended . . . For Now

– Posted in: Temporary Protected Status

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From its beginning, the history of Haiti Temporary Protected Status has resembled a political roller coaster ride.

The stability which TPS was created to provide a community during a crisis has been deficient and unsteady throughout the program’s nine-year existence.

As a result, the 2017 announcement that the program would be terminated on July 22, 2019 did not surprise Haitian community leaders.  Many believe Haiti TPS has been a disfavored programs since its inception.

Why Are Citizenship Cases Taking So Long?

– Posted in: Citizenship And Naturalization

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My father became a naturalized citizen in 1951.  From start to finish, the paperwork took less than six months for the government to process.

His journey to the United States, the prelude to naturalization, was fraught with danger and discrimination, neither of which deterred him from his mission to provide a modest level of financial support for his mother and siblings living abroad in poverty.

When he was sworn in, he had no idea that one day he would vote in the presidential elections for John F. Kennedy.

One Million Backlogged Immigration Court Cases And Growing

– Posted in: Immigration Court

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One hour, 10.5 minutes.

That’s how much time, on the average, an immigration judge has to dedicate to an immigrant’s case at the Los Angeles immigration court per year.

If you’re one of the thousands of Angelinos, who has been summoned to 606 South Olive,  in overcrowded Los Angeles, to an overcrowded court, consider yourself lucky.

Immigration judges nationwide get less time to review similar matters.

The Separation Of Mixed-Status Immigrant Families: Why Citizen Spouses Are The Key To Reform

– Posted in: Permanent Residence And Green Cards

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According to Kim Anderson, former President of American Families United, “U.S. citizens are the most neglected constituency in the immigration debate.”

Hyperbole aside, Anderson raises a critically significant issue that is grossly undervalued by many pro-immigrant advocates.

Simply stated, U.S. citizen spouses are far too minimized in immigration reform discourse.

6 Immigration Predictions You Should Pay Attention To In 2018

– Posted in: Immigration Reform

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Editor’s Note: If you would like to read immigration predictions for 2019, see this article: Five Immigrant Rights Activists Share Their Predictions For 2019.

By Chasity Alvarez

As 2018 begins, there are several issues which all immigrants and their families will need to face in the coming year.

Before jumping in, I would first like to address a point raised by President Trump last year.